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Booking your next vacation at a family-friendly resort might just be the best thing you can do to help insure you get the most out of your time away. This is true even if you're a solo traveler, venturing out with your friends, or a couple with no children.

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Comments Showing of 32 32 new post a comment ยป. Feb 14, AM. Interesting analysis. It would explain as to why Myrtle ran out to meet Tom in the car as she was getting desperate as to the baby's and her future. I would fault your comments about Wilson's intellectual deficiency. He is a mechanic, hardly of moronic intellect.

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Because he is not college educated, don't underestimate him. Once doesn't have to graduate phi beta kappa to put two and two together. The vast majority of people, well educated or not, can surmise the obvious. Feb 14, PM. Geoffrey wrote: "Interesting analysis.

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I would fault your comments about Wilson's intel Fitzgerald purposefully does that to show the distinctions between the classes. Myrtle talks informally by mistake and Wilson is in the same class as her. People in the same class are often highly similar, because Fitzgerald shows class as a fundamental personality trait.

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I think Gary's idea makes sense. Gary wrote: " Why should he do a hit and run? Gatsby has no motive to kill Myrtle. He doesn't even know who she is.

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See issue 2 below. If he was driving the car the worst he'd have been charged with would be something like manslaughter, vehicular homicide, or whatever term they use in New York at that time, and even being charged in the first place is doubtful given the circumstances of that killing. Having his name dragged through the mud in the newspapers would stop people coming to his parties, which are deed to attract suckers to buy his worthless bonds.

By stopping his car and facing the music he and Wolfsheim would stand to lose millions. Gary wrote: "Or it could just be, as the text indicatesshe was driving and he's now willing to accept the responsibility in order to protect her. Actually, it is Nick who suggests Gatsby was driving. Gatsby simply agrees to it.

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Blaming Daisy to Nick--and to no one else--serves two purposes: a it makes Gatsby look heroic in Nick's eyes and b it gives Gatsby a reason for not stopping the car. Gatsby's tried three times to recruit Nick, a bond salesman, into his bond scam. Nick admires Gatsby, thinks he's "gorgeous" and gushes over him when Gatsby smiles at him. He had one of those rare smiles with a quality of eternal reassurance in it, that you may come across four or five times in life.

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It faced, or seemed to face, the whole external world for an instant and then concentrated on you with an irresistible prejudice in your favor. It understood you just as far as you wanted to be understood, believed in you as you would like to believe in yourself. Gary wrote: "If we're to believe Gatsby was really driving, and wants to blame Daisy, we're also to believe he doesn't go to anyone else with that story, nor does he turn her in, which would be the way a guilty person trying to frame someone else would go about it.

Besides, it would be his word against hers, and all the other witnesses saw a man driving. Gary wrote: "For the either driver to speed off, they'd have to know who it was run down. Otherwise, it makes little sense for either of them to run Gatsby couldn't stop for the reason I just mentioned; he can't afford to have his name in the papers because it would interfere with his sales of illicit bonds.

He can't afford to be investigated at all by the police because it would reveal his connections with the notorious Meyer Wolfsheim, a well-known crime figure who infamously fixed the World Series. Gary wrote: " It was Gatsby. To believe Daisy was driving you have to accept the word of Jay Gatsby--a criminal bootlegger who lies and most likely far worse for a living, who concocted an outrageous lie to Nick about his family history, who is involved with a notorious kingpin in organized crime Wolfsheim in a fraud to sell illicit worthless bonds--over contradictory testimony of multiple eyewitnesses, some of whom were interrogated by a policeman at the scene of the accident and one of whom, Michaelis, was sworn in at the inquest.

One hundred percent of these eyewitnesses say a woman wasn't driving, yet Nick chooses to believe a confirmed liar and criminal.

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Gatsby has everything to gain by lying to Nick and nothing to lose because it's his word against Daisy's, at worst. On what basis can Nick justify believing that Daisy was driving, given Gatsby's history of lying to him about his family history and exaggerating his attendance at Oxford?

On what basis do you believe Gatsby? Because you like him? If so, is it because you're forced to see Gatsby through Nick's biased eyes?

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Gary wrote: "Everyone else saw what was going on. Wouldn't a driver's first reaction be to try to slow? We must assume that there wasn't enough time to avoid a collision. Perhaps Gatsby and Daisy were absorbed in their plight, distracted in a discussion about the Plaza Hotel confrontation.

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Maybe he was trying to convince her he wasn't a crook. What is unquestionable is that regardless who was driving, it was Gatsby's car and his responsibility to stop and render aid. He chose to run, a cowardly selfish choice revealing his corrupt character. And it is Gatsby's corrupt choice to run that le directly to his death.

Had he stopped to render aid, Wilson would not have a reason to hunt him down and kill him. Dramapuppy wrote: "Geoffrey wrote: "Interesting analysis. I would fault your comments abo Where do you have evidence of that? Feb 15, AM. Geoffrey wrote; "SF tars the lower classes by his valley of ashes description of their environment, but I would be hard pressed to argue for Wilson's stupidity. Tom is a good example of this; despite his education, he is an ignorant jerk and nothing about him exudes higher intelligence. Feb 15, PM. Yes, pretty much everyone in this novel is stupid.

I do not know for sure that Wilson isn't smart, but I do know that Myrtle isn't and people in the same class are usually similar. This is because class is fundamental to a person's identity in this book.

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Myrtle is shown to be stupid by speaking informally and reading trashy magazines like the "Town Tattle" and a "moving picture magazine. Myrtle still dreams of becoming rich, not realizing that it will never happen. Feb 16, PM. Gary wrote: "did Daisy kill her on purpose in order to protect her marriage, her reputation, and the position of her own child? Daisy knows Tom is having an affair, but how would she know it was specifically with Myrtle? Daisy has never been to the garage, Daisy only knows that some woman calls her husband.

Feb 17, PM. Gary wrote: "Is Myrtle suicidal? I had thought before about Myrtle being suicidal. At any rate, her words ' You can't live forever' are certainly foreshadowing. If she thinks the affair with Tom is over, Myrtle could easily be suicidal. Feb 22, PM. Christine wrote: "If she thinks the affair with Tom is over, Myrtle could easily be suicidal. Myrtle is consistently dramatic and over-wrought throughout the book.

At the very least, she's capable of suicidally stupid histrionics, like running out in front of a moving car. Again, the idea that Myrtle might be suicidal is not, in and of itself, indicative that she was pregnant, but a pregnancy would act as an additional factor in that motivator for her behavior. I wonder, though, would Daisy care enough to be bothered with hiring a detective to trace Tom's lover?

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